It’s not uncommon for those looking to sell their home to become hopeful about certain potential buyers, only for the buyers to suddenly lose interest. You could be left scratching your head, wondering what you’ve done wrong. With everything on a home seller’s plate, they may have overlooked something that resulted in the buyers becoming uninterested. If you’re selling your home, take a look at these common potential buyer turn offs:

You’re not following procedure

Though it may depend on the market, a home sale transaction follows a certain legal and traditional procedure. If you don’t follow this established process, this could be seen as a red flag for buyers, who do not want a mess over technical matters to get in the way of buying their home. Hiring a good agent can ensure that you’re following the status-quo.

You’re always present at showings

A general rule for showings is that it is better for the seller not to be there. Potential buyers feel freer to take a serious look at a home if the buyer isn’t buzzing around. Looking at a stranger’s home is already slightly awkward, and so a buyer’s presence can take them out of their element and distract them from looking close enough for fear of being impolite. Without the seller’s presence, the buyer can more freely critique the home and tell their true feelings to their agent and buying partners so they can find the perfect piece of Berkeley real estate.

You weren’t totally forthcoming

When you put your home up for sale, you have to inform potential buyers about the home’s vulnerabilities that could cause issues for the new owner in the future. Disclosure isn’t just courteous, they’re required. Misrepresenting homes to buyers has resulted in lawsuits over later problems with the house, such as a chronically leaky roof or a driveway that is prone to flooding. A famous case over termites in 1986, Hill v. Jones, came about because the buyer failed to inform the seller of an infestation before the parties had entered into a contract.

Your price is too high

Whether you are leaving room for negotiation or truly feel that your home deserves a higher asking price than what your research or agent is telling you is fair, a price that is too high is one of the biggest turn offs for buyers. Even if the buyer initially show interest, they may need to be looking for some big redeeming quality with the property to justify spending so much money on a home, and then retreat after finding none. Or, perhaps their lower bid was rejected, and they feel they’ve lost steam when it comes to the home. An unfair asking price could also be seen as a sign that your judgment could make you difficult to do business with.

About PorchLight Real Estate: PorchLight Real Estate Group has the most experienced and knowledgeable Denver real estate agents in Colorado. For more information about homes for sale in Denver CO or specific neighborhood homes please visit www.porchlightgroup.com.

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